computer lessons

Microsoft Exchange Server in Outlook 2010

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I noticed that I was receiving email on my mobile that I wasn’t receiving on my desktop through Microsoft Office Outlook 2010 Pro. The last mail I had received was on the 9th of July. I searched high and low (for 2-3 days) and couldn’t find the reason why. There just wasn’t any useful explanation on why outlook.com emails weren’t received in Outlook 2010.

I remembered some Microsoft emails way back in Feb. / Mar that was talking about not receiving emails after their server upgrade. This email stated that I delete the existing IMAP account and create a new Microsoft exchange account. That sounded easy enough. What I didn’t do was to back up the old system and that’s where all my problems started.

I had a beautiful automated system that worked with three POP3/SMTP accounts all embedded into one primary, plus five separate IMAP (one hotmail.com, one live.co.uk, two outlook.com and one gmail.com) accounts. The whole email system was controlled by approximately 360 rules that would move my emails into relevant folders depending on contents and where they came from.

I also had a fantastic task setup that would automatically create a new task when completing the old one.

This is what happened when I changed the first of the four Microsoft accounts to “Microsoft exchange server” my system was destroyed! The reconfiguring of that account merged itself into my primary account with the other POP3/SMTP accounts.

I could NOT uninstall it without uninstalling the perfectly good POP3 accounts. Not only did it not want to be uninstalled it also became the master of the group, and because it didn’t have any rules and tasks, guess what; I lost the work I had created over the years, no rule, and no tasks. What a mess! Thank you Microsoft another brilliant software manipulation! I also lost the use of my shared linked Hotmail calendar (again).

As you can see I have had a brilliant week trying to solve problems introduced by Microsoft converting (forcing) everybody to use Office365.

NO, NO, NO I am not going there! There is harvesting, and there is harvesting of user data; but sorry not with me!

So what was the solution with Outlook 2010? I have recreated everything (I hope) in Mozilla Thunderbird. The only outstanding topic is my tasks. I must admit that the task handling in Outlook 2010 was quite brilliant.

Again the calendar was a little tricky to get working as Microsoft doesn’t permit Thunderbird to sync both ways with their calendar; but they do let Google sync both ways (I think but it doesn’t seem to work anymore), so I loaded Google calendar with my Microsoft online calendar; then I loaded Thunderbird with “Provider for Google Calendar add-on” and imported the Google calendar – without any problems and now I can update my Microsoft calendar from my desktop, my mobile and my tablet. Brilliant!

Movie Maker by Microsoft

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Have you ever on your smart-phone or your camera shot a whole movie upside down or sideways?
When you look at it, at home on your PC, you could cry! What to do?  Bin it or try to recover it?
Don’t worry; Microsoft can help you here.  Download and install from the Microsoft download site: “Movie Maker”.
Read about it here.
For a Microsoft software it’s quite user-friendly, you can even publish direct to YouTube

Check for duplicated files

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How many duplicated files have you got?
Have you ever wondered if you have backed-up or copied a file to somewhere?
Have you ever wondered if and how many versions of the same file you have stored on your pc?

You don’t have to wonder anymore!

A student of mine was asking if I knew a way to find all the duplicated files stored on his computer.
I didn’t, but goggled for it, and yes, I did find a very useful small program dupeGuru (hardcoded.net);
which is a tool to find duplicate files on your computer. It can scan either filenames or contents.

Easy merge of PDF files

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I was scanning a booklet into PDF formatted files; but I really only  wanted one file and couldn’t remember how to make the scanner do the work.

So I looked around and found this easy and free software: PDFbinder (and downloaded it from CNET).
Wow it worked, it wasn’t intrusive to install, and it was quick; all I had to do was adding the files I wanted to merge; move them around into sequence and press “Bind” then tell it the new name and where to save it.

That was all. Great stuff.

Outlook.com introduces the most sophisticated rules in webmail

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When it comes to getting organized, Outlook.com has you covered. Starting today, we are releasing Advanced Rules and three other features, all to help you keep your inbox in top shape and make it even easier to see the email that matters to you. The average person has 184 emails in their inbox, and receives 28 emails each day.* This can be a lot to handle, so helping you get to the email you care about is one of our top priorities. Outlook.com already has a number of features to help you do this. For example, Sweep (one of our most popular) helps you quickly delete multiple unwanted emails. more…

written by Mike Schackwitz, on May 13, 2014

Joy of being an IT Buddy

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I have now been working as a volunteer in CMK Library since January 2014 and I am thoroughly enjoying it, even to the extent that instead of 2 hours 1 day a week, I am doing 3 hours twice a week.

It is interesting to see lots of people and be able to show them the way into computing. Also it’s interesting to extract the information about what they know and what they would like to know.

Best of all for them – they get one hour free tuition.

As an example: I have one learner who has done a lot of surfing but his knowledge is like a heap of stones where I have to find the concrete to build a foundation for him to progress, which is difficult because when he sees something (like e-mail) that he is currently not using his auto reaction is “Oh I don’t need that” so in his world he would skip it! No, no – that’s exactly what is needed for filling the holes between the stones. This is just one example of the difficulties I am up against and that is not to mention the language barriers.

PC support scam cold calls

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PC support scams should not be taken lightly.

Beyond the annoyance of receiving the calls, they can leave victims out of pocket and potentially at risk of having their personal details lifted from their PCs.

Here are the essentials of what you need to do to stay protected:

When the phone rings…

1. If they say they’re from Microsoft:
  • They’re not. Microsoft will never call its customers directly.
  • The safest thing to do is to hang up immediately!
2. If they say your PC is running slowly:
  • They don’t know this.
  • Even Microsoft itself cannot know what state your computer is in, as error report data is always anonymous.
3. If they say you have a virus:
  • You can check this yourself using your security software.
  • Never trust an unsolicited caller who claims that your PC is under threat.
4. If they want to remotely access you PC:
  • Never, ever allow them to.
  • This hands the keys to your PC to a scammer.
  • At best, they’ll waste your time and money.
  • At worst, they’ll infect it with malware and potentially steal personal details
If you think you’ve been a victim…

  • Run a virus scan
  • If you’ve allowed a cold caller remote access to your PC, run a virus scan with your security software to make sure that it hasn’t been infected.

Alert your bank

  • It’s an inconvenience, but if you think there’s any chance your personal and card details are at risk, contact your bank and request that they freeze your card account and issue you with a new card.

Contact Action Fraud

  • If you’ve paid for the PC support, or lost money to credit card fraud, contact Action Fraud and get a crime reference number.
  • You’ll need this for pursuing a claim with your bank to return the lost funds.
  • Go to: www.actionfraud.police.uk/report_fraud
    or call: 0300 123 2040

Keep yourself up-to-date on the latest frauds and alerts: